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How To Most Effectively Get Rid Of Keloid Scars Through Non Surgical Methods

 
How To Most Effectively Get Rid Of Keloid Scars Through Non Surgical Methods

how to get rid of keoid scars

Options to Get Rid of Keloid Scars Without Surgery

In this report we address options to diminish scars that form in our body when we experience cuts or injuries. Three types of scars encompass the full range of how they can appear on the skin.

1. Pitted, atrophic scars will leave the cut or injury indented.

2. Raised, hypertrophic scars will develop on top of the injury or cut but not extending beyond its borders.

3. Apart from those are keloid scars. These mature above and beyond the borders of the injury or cut to parts of the skin that were not originally injured. This is the trickiest form of scar to treat for a variety of reasons.

BIOSKINREPAIR is a keloid scar removal cream comprised of all natural ingredients coupled with the secretions of a mollusk having the scientific name of Helix Aspersa. The properties of this ingredient are successful for keloid scar treatment as it nourishes the immune cells that reside among our skin tissues and they are then able to repair the damaged tissues and regenerate new tissues biologically. This keloid scar removal product is available through Amazon.com and also directly at our safe shopping store.

Keep reading and you will learn all about your options and why a biological solution that nourishes your living cells is non-invasive, more sophisticated, balanced and complete than any clever concoction made in a laboratory.

How Keloid Scars Occur

First and foremost the sources of keloid scars can vary from burns to cuts to piercings to inflammatory reactions resulting from acne.

Secondly they may only begin to form after much time has elapsed since the original injury.

The third and most dispiriting issue is that removing the scar successfully via surgery can very easily cause a new keloid scar to expand over the surgery wound!

These factors that characterize keloid scars call for a deeper investigation as how to properly treat them.

The body is programmed to heal any open wound in a specific way. Skin cells of the type known as fibroblasts residing at the basal layer of the epidermis (the outer layer of the skin, not more than 1cm deep) begin proliferating to repair the damage. The fibroblasts generate a set of connective tissues (collagen and elastin and water binging molecules) where the skin cells migrate and close the wound.

Usually both fibroblasts and skin cells are produced at the same rate, and the result is a normal scar that fades with time. But, if the connective tissues are created at a faster rate that the skin cells, they will form a thick cluster that keep the skin cells from reaching the surface. The result, in this case, is a raised scar known as a keloid scar or hypertrophic scar.

What is the difference between these types of scars? Below we examine the differences between these types of scars as well as hypertrophic and keloid scar treatment.

Keloid Scars

Keloid scars are scars that exceed the area of the original wound. They are a puckered, itchy cluster of scar tissue that rises above the rest of the skin. This type of raised scars are irregular in shape and, unlike other types of scars, they usually do not fade with time, but grow larger.

They can be pinkish or red and have a tendency to become fairly large and unattractive. Besides their undesirable appearance, keloids tend to be itchy and tender to the touch. On a microscopic level, keloids contain thick, abundant collagen bundles that form nodules deep within the scar.

Hypertrophic Scars

Hypertrophic scars are caused because the body overproduces collagen. The result of this anomaly is a raised scar like a keloid scar. However, unlike keloids, hypertrophic scars do not grow beyond the limits of the original wound.

Treatment for Raised Scars

There are several treatments for raised scars. But, we will take a look at a couple of the most common ones: compression therapy and corticosteroid injections.

Compression therapy involves applying pressure to the scar. Scientific tests have shown that the pressure applied to the scar reduces the cohesiveness of collagen fibers and deters the formation of hypertrophic scars. Compression treatments include ACE bandages, elastic adhesive bandages, compression wraps, spandex or Lycra bandages among others.

Intralesional corticosteroid injections have been a common treatment to promote hypertrophic scar healing.

Intralesional corticosteroid injections help inhibit the development of scar tissue by reducing collagen synthesis, by altering glucosaminoglycan synthesis (the water holding molecules in the skin), and by inhibiting the production of fibroblast proliferation during wound healing.

Surgery, cryo treatments and laser therapy are other alternatives for the treatment of raised scars. Check with your doctor to choose the best alternative for you.

When anomalous scar healing leads to hypertrophic or keloid scars, you do have a wide range of treatment alternatives from which to choose. Besides compression therapy and corticosteroid injections, raised scars treatments can include deep tissue massages and skin exfoliation.

Finding an Effective Treatment for Keloids

Doctors commonly make use of additional treatments to accompany surgery to diminish the chances of a post keloid treatment recurrence. The primary techniques associated with this method are compression therapy and steroid injections.

Steroid injections can be used both before, during, or after the surgery with the benefit of flattening the form of the scar. Long-acting cortisone (steroid) shots are generally injected on average once a month with the difference in size apparent in 3 to 6 months time. Their advantage is the cortisone treats the scar with only a very small amount of it entering the bloodstream.

Compression bandages when used as a treatment for scars are believed to work by restricting oxygen to the scar which cuts down on the biological process that leads to the formation of keloid scars. They are customized made garments that are made so they are worn 24 hours a day and changed once a week for a period of six to eighteen months. They have a track record of successfully decreasing the size of the scar but the effort and time is very consuming.

Keloid Scar Removal By Use Of An All Natural Cream

Skin products that use 100% natural ingredients stimulate overall scar healing of keloids.

BIOSKINREPAIR is a keloid scar removal cream comprised of all natural ingredients coupled with the secretions of a mollusk having the scientific name of Helix Aspersa. The properties of this ingredient are successful for keloid scar treatment as it nourishes the immune cells that reside among our skin tissues and they are then able to repair the damaged tissues and regenerate new tissues biologically. This keloid scar removal product is available through Amazon.com and also directly at our safe shopping store.

According to science the secretions of this mollusk are produced inside the immune cells of the innate immune system of the mollusk which does not have an adaptive immune system. Thus it has evolved a solution for cuts and abrasions, solar radiation and even to regenerate parts of its body, mouth and tentacles, where its eyes are, when bitten by birds that relies on nourishing the cells with a complex made of soluble proteins, water binding carbohydrate molecules bound to copper, calcium, zinc, iron and other trace elements and to enzymes and co-enzymes.

Scientists of the Dermatology Service of The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and from other prestigious institutions have confirmed the powerful antioxidant, fibroblast growth factor like activity and skin regeneration properties of the mollusk’s secretions.

how to effectively get rid of keloid scars with mollusk secretion

Link: Skin Regeneration Properties of Mollusk Secretion – It leads to the publications of researchers enrolled by the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center of New York.

How It Works? It works very much in the same way as how an oyster (marine mollusk) coats an irritant to its soft tissues with a substance secreted by its immune system, and in the process, little by little yields a beautiful Pearl.

Science does not know why keloids form in some people while not in others and the molecular changes that lead to keloids are not well understood, so instead of trying to explain the intricacies of what the secretions of a terrestrial mollusk of the species Helix Aspersa, also known as the humble brown garden snail, does to your skin deep within to orchestarte an orderly regeneration of skin wounded or injured, we invite you to try it yourself.

In fact, we are so confident in BIOSKINREPAIR as the best cream to get rid of keloids available, that if you do not see dramatic results within a 30-60 days, we will give you 100% of Your Money Back!!!

You have absolutely nothing to lose except your scars.

References About Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars

1. Keloid: A case report and review of pathophysiology and differences between keloid and hypertrophic scars. Hunasgi S, Koneru A, Vanishree M, Shamala R. J Oral Maxillofac Pathol [serial online] 2013 [cited 2013 Jun 6];17:116-20. Available from: http://www.jomfp.in/text.asp?2013/17/1/116/110701

2. Spontaneous Unilateral Earlobe Keloid
Ji Hae Park, Tae Hwan Park and Choong Hyun Chang
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Arch Craniofac Surg. 2013 Apr;14(1):58-60. Korean.
Published online 2013 April 16. http://dx.doi.org/10.7181/acfs.2013.14.1.58
© 2013 The Korean Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association

3. A novel three-dimensional model system for the study on how to get rid of keloid scars
Won Jai Lee MD, PhD, Il-Kyu Choi PhD, Ju Hee Lee MD, PhD, Yong Oock Kim MD, PhD, Chae-Ok Yun PhD. © 2012 by the Wound Healing Society

4. The Anti-Scar Effects of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor on the Wound Repair In Vitro and In Vivo. PLoS ONE 8(4): e59966. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0059966
Shi H-X, Lin C, Lin B-B, Wang Z-G, Zhang H-Y, et al. (2013)

Editor: Aimin Xu, University of Hong Kong, China

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